DCR Reference Sources

From Washington State Health Care Authority resources

Verified/updated February 2019

Washington State Health Care Authority Designated Crisis Responder Website

 

DCR Specific Information Links:

 

2017 Designated Crisis Responder Protocols

 

"The 2017 update of the Protocols for Designated Mental Health Professionals (DMHPs) is provided by the Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS), Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery (DBHR), as mandated by RCW 71.05.214."

WA State ITA Statute RCW 71.05 - Adult

 

  • WA State Information Page: Ricky's Law
  • On April 1, 2018, changes in the adult and youth Involuntary Treatment Act (ITA) for Substance Use Disorders (SUD) went into effect.

    Community members who are a danger to themselves or others, other’s property, or gravely disabled due to a drug or alcohol problem may be involuntary detained to a secure withdrawal management and stabilization facility—also known as secure detox.

    Important note: Involuntary commitment for substance use disorder (SUD) can ONLY occur if there is an open placement in an appropriate SUD secure withdrawal management and stabilization facility.

 

  • WA State Information Page: Joel's Law
  • A new section of Washington State’s involuntary mental health treatment law or ITA (Revised Code of Washington 71.05) went into effect July 24, 2015. This new section is known as Joel’s Law. It provides a formal legal mechanism by which family members, guardians, or conservators may petition directly to the court when a DCR has decided not to detain an adult, or when a DCR’s investigation is not completed within 48 hours.

    • Who can file a Joel’s Law petition: If you are a spouse, registered domestic partner, child, stepchild, parent, stepparent, grandparent, sibling, legal guardian, or conservator of an adult that you seek to have detained, you may file a petition under Joel’s Law.
    • When can I file a Joel’s Law Petition: A DCR has conducted an investigation and decided not to detain that person for involuntary evaluation and treatment; or, it has been 48 hours since the DCR office received a request for investigation, and a DCR has not taken action to investigate the request.

 

WA State ITA Statute RCW 71.34 - Minors (13-18)

 

  • WA State Information Page: Ricky's Law
  • On April 1, 2018, changes in the adult and youth Involuntary Treatment Act (ITA) for Substance Use Disorders (SUD) went into effect.

    Community members who are a danger to themselves or others, other’s property, or gravely disabled due to a drug or alcohol problem may be involuntary detained to a secure withdrawal management and stabilization facility—also known as secure detox.

    Important note: Involuntary commitment for substance use disorder (SUD) can ONLY occur if there is an open placement in an appropriate SUD secure withdrawal management and stabilization facility.

  • RCW 71.34.375: Parent Initiated Inpatient Treatment, Minors 13-18
    • The following information is from Washington State Health Care Authority Frequently Asked Questions

      • Can a parent take a minor to a community mental health agency for an assessment without the consent of the minor?
      • Yes. A parent may bring his or her minor child to a provider of outpatient mental health treatment and request that the minor be examined to determine whether the minor has a mental disorder and is in need of treatment. The consent of the minor is not required for evaluation (RCW 71.34.600).

        The professional person may do an assessment to determine whether the minor has a mental disorder and is in need of outpatient treatment (RCW 71.34.600).

      • Can a parent take a minor to an inpatient mental health treatment facility for an assessment without the consent of the minor?
      • Yes. A parent may bring a minor in acute need of inpatient care to an evaluation and treatment (E&T) facility and request that the professional person examine the minor to determine whether the minor has a mental disorder and is in need of inpatient treatment (RCW 71.34.600-660)

        • The consent of the minor is not required for admission, evaluation, and treatment if the parent brings the minor to the facility (RCW 71.34.600-660).
        • A minor cannot be admitted to inpatient treatment unless it is medically necessary as a result of a mental disorder (RCW 71.34.052)
        • Prior approval by the RSN is necessary for all admissions for publicly funded treatment in acute inpatient facilities.
      • Can parents look at their adolescent's mental health records without his or her consent if the adolescent is over thirteen years of age?
        • If your adolescent is over thirteen, be aware he or she will be asked to sign a release of information before you can access your adolescent's mental health records (RCW 70.02 and RCW 71.34).

WA State Criminal Insanity Statute RCW 10.77